Universal Exhibition of Agricultural, Industrial and Fine Arts Products - Paris 1855

Agriculture, Industry and Fine Arts

May 15, 1855 - November 15, 1855


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Access gallery to the Annex

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To guide the visitor in the most suitable manner, we will ask him to go up to the small gallery on the Cours-la-Reine side, where he will find some furniture made of Algerian wood and silk fabrics made in Lyon from Algerian silks. Then a large group of display cases filled, on the left side, with agricultural products; on the right side, wax and other models of stuffed birds, etc., surgical apparatus, etc., are displayed. New methods of teaching reading, writing and arithmetic are displayed along the wall. The second group of showcases contains surgical instruments of all kinds. The third group is devoted to the art of dentistry and astronomical instruments. Next come the papers, instruments of physics, geometry, optics, etc., electrical apparatus, stereoscopes, etc., exhibited by France.

Belgium exhibits here beehives and agricultural products of all kinds, optical and physical instruments in general, telegraphs; and Austria, agricultural products, cutlery, magnetic and electrical apparatus of great beauty, weapons, geological maps and clocks. Prussia also has here electrical appliances, optical instruments, paper, rubber goods, etc.; Hesse, Saxony and Wurtemberg have agricultural products, minerals, paper, etc.; Norway has picturesque costumes, sledges, carriages and hides. The Dutch East India Company exhibits fabrics, agricultural products, wood, and objects used by the natives. Next come items from Norway, namely: agricultural products, minerals, household utensils, paper, and wood of all kinds. Sardinia has marble, minerals, etc., and Rome, the model of a roof made without using wood.

After passing some models of civil constructions, some minerals, terracotta objects and others, from France, we come to England and its colonies. There are alpacas, beehives and wallpaper from Britain. New Zealand exhibits woods, minerals and a very original collection of curiosities from that country, sent by Colonel Wyngard. The Cape of Good Hope has sent minerals, agricultural products, leather, wood, and some furniture made of these woods. Van Diemen's Land has stuffed birds, minerals and agricultural products; Australia has samples of letterpress, stuffed birds, ores from its gold mines, a hive of bees, grain, wines, etc. After the stuffed animals, skins, pictures of natives and other curiosities of the Indian Archipelago, comes Ceylon, which ends this gallery. This colony exhibits models of boats, furniture, jewellery, and various objects made by the natives.

©Promenades dans l'exposition de 1855