Brussels World and International Exhibition 1910

Works of Art, Scientific Works and Products of Industry and Agriculture of all Nations

April 23, 1910 - November 1, 1910


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Sunlight - Soap

Sunlight - Soap at the Exhibition Expo Brussels 1910

The Forest factory is a model factory, manufacturing an incomparable product. The participation of the Sunlight in our world's fair allows the public to get an exact idea of the manufacture of the soap that they prefer.

Follow the majestic avenue that leads from the entrance of the Exhibition to the festival hall. No sooner have you passed the large pool from which the nymphs and pelicans emerge than your attention is suddenly drawn to an elegant building, all white in the green setting provided by the nearby foliage of the Bois de la Cambre.

You would think you were in front of a stately home. The style is sober and tasteful. It is Flemish Renaissance, skilfully modernised. Large windows distribute the light. A graceful turret tops one of the corners of the building. An artistically designed gable rises above the door. A small semi-circular building, crowned by a pretty balustrade decorated with vases, completes the pavilion to the north. This elegant building, which looks very good next to the artistic monuments erected by the cities of Brussels, Ghent and Liege, is the Sunlight Pavilion.

Let's go inside now. From the avenue, a few steps lead us up. We are in a large, bright white room, an exhibition hall, a shop and a workshop all in one.

Large frescoes covering a large section of wall introduce us to the work of saponification, while in the room male and female workers carry out the various operations of cutting, punching and packing the yellowish paste, which has been converted into symmetrical blocks and placed in those elegant boxes that all our housewives know.

At the back of the room is a panorama, which immediately captures our attention. It now shows us the practical results of this work, presented in an original and lively way. The soap briquettes, carefully packed in small square boxes, were delivered to the retail trade. Housewives have bought it. Its useful role will begin. Its unparalleled qualities will be revealed. Indeed, the panorama we are talking about, raised about a metre above the floor of the room, shows us, in a farmyard, in front of the flowery countryside, women busy with the work of washing. With their hands immersed in the basins, they are using the wonderful soap which, while reducing the effort and work, will give the laundry an unparalleled whiteness.

And is this not the best conception of an exhibition? What does it matter to display products if we are not shown the processes of their manufacture, if we are not made to feel, in a striking way, the advantages and qualities of them? Imagined in this way, an exhibition fulfils its true role: to educate while interesting, which is what the Brussels representatives of Sunlight Soap have understood so well in organising this splendid picture of industrial activity, so lively. Numerous visitors flock to this pavilion at any time of the day, where one can see the products that are now known and appreciated throughout the world and used in every household.

This famous firm owed it to its reputation to offer to the crowds attracted by our world's fair one of the most original and practically interesting spectacles imaginable.

© Exposition Universelle de Bruxelles 1910