International Exhibition of Industry and Labour - Turin 1911

Industry and Labor

April 29, 1911 - November 19, 1911


Back - List of Pavilions

Gallery of Work

Gallery of Work at the Exhibition Turin 1911

We shall continue to call the gallery of machines in action, which opens to the right of the entrance to the Cours Raphaël, by its old and happy name of Galerie du Travail, although in 1911 such a name seems inappropriate. With the dominant idea of the Exhibition to present, as far as possible, all the industries in activity, capturing them, through the different transformations, in their progressive development, the whole International Exhibition should, to put it exactly, be defined as one great, immense gallery of work.

Having made this remark - and we can repeat it for the electricity gallery we have just visited - let us enter the gallery of machines in action.

245 metres long, 80 metres wide, with a total area of 16,600 square metres, it is perhaps the most international gallery of the Exhibition. Here all the nations, even those that have exhibited extensively in their own pavilions, such as England, France, Germany and Belgium, have come together. If you listen carefully to the rhythm of the machines in motion, you can feel the joyful, lively, or rough and tumble soul of the nations that built them, so true is it that man puts the stamp of his own personality on all the works that come out of his hands. The public, which knows how to guess all this, is always
The public, which knows how to guess all this, always rushes around the wheels that turn silently, the pistons that come and go regularly, taking with them the trinkets that they have seen created before their eyes and which will remind them, later on, of the miracles of manufacture that they have witnessed.
Symmetrical with the electricity gallery, the work gallery, with its powerful iron framework, also has a light greenish decoration that rests the eye without disturbing its observation.

©Guide Officiel de l'Exposition Internationale de Turin 1911