Centennial Exposition Philadelphia 1876

Centenary of American Independence and the Declaration of Independence of July 4, 1776

May 10, 1876 - November 10, 1876


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transportation

transportation at the Exhibition Philadelphia 1876

Architect(s) : H. J. Schwarzmann

transportation at the Exhibition Philadelphia 1876

Architect(s) : H. J. Schwarzmann

This spacious pavilion can be seen as an annex to the main exhibition building, in which the area was so busy with quality products that it was thought that the vehicles would not receive the attention they deserved.

The Transportation Building is immediately to the east of Memorial Hall and would be considered elsewhere than on the Centennial grounds as a large structure.

It is a parallelogram 392 feet long and 277 feet wide. It is constructed of wood sheathed on the outside with corrugated iron. It is only one storey high, but from floor to roof is 36 feet. A hipped roof rises from the walls, which are 24 feet high, and in this there are five skylights which run the length of the building and provide abundant light to the interior. This necessity is further assisted by a large number of windows, each 14 feet high, on the sides of the building.

There are 4 large entrances, with ancillary offices, and a number of smaller ones. The floor space is 100,000 square feet and the interior is occupied by specimens of light and heavy coaches, luxury wagons and pleasure cars, fashionable vehicles, sleighs, omnibuses and railway wagons sent from Great Britain, Canada, Germany, Austria, Belgium, Italy, France and the United States.

The architect was H. J. Schwarzmann.

©Centennial portfolio: a souvenir of the international exhibition at Philadelphia - 1876