Centennial Exposition Philadelphia 1876

Centenary of American Independence and the Declaration of Independence of July 4, 1776

May 10, 1876 - November 10, 1876


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Pomology

Pomology at the Exhibition Philadelphia 1876

To the east of the northern section of the Agricultural Palace and to the south of the Brewery Building is the Fruit Exhibition Annex.

This is one of several ground structures that must be used occasionally and may, at various times during the exhibition season, be entirely empty.

The building is temporary in character, and is therefore clearly constructed, without any effort at ornamentation. The attention which has been given to the building is such that it will facilitate the main object for which it was built - utility - the perfect adaptation to the purpose being the sole subject of study.

The pomological building extends from east to west, and is 180x200 feet in size. The exterior at the east and west ends shows a series of four shed roofs and four gables, between which are aisles running the length of the building from east to west. The walls rise from the ground at a convenient distance from the roof, from which extend continuous windows on all sides of the building, which throw light and can be fitted for ventilation.

The main sections resemble lanterns over the aisles and are also fitted with side lights, so that the interior is bright and cheerful, and the best opportunities are given for viewing whatever is on exhibition.

There are four main avenues and five aisles running the length of the building, intersected by five cross-aisles. In the centre of these aisles are the tables, four in each row, with tables at the side rows and at the ends of the building, making fifty-two tables not including the tables around the four sides of the flat. These tables are designed to showcase the fruit, with shelves in the form of truncated pyramids. The roof is supported by simple joists and beams, arranged without display of ornamentation for utility purposes only.

The avenues are about 6 feet wide. Light and air are abundant. The interior is painted white, which makes the appearance of the great hall cheerful and attractive for designed purposes. The main entrances are in the centre, on either side, with Gothic doors. In this building, during the season, there will be exhibitions of fresh American fruit in particular, as they appear when picked before decay. The programme includes special displays of strawberries, blackberries, raspberries and other berries. Melon, citron and cantaloupe will be duly featured.

The peach will be displayed in its lush beauty. In autumn, pears and apples, plums and grapes, will be presented in all varieties, fresh and lush. The arrangement will free the agricultural palace from what might sometimes be an inconvenience; and for the accommodation of visitors or persons willing to examine for themselves, the pomological building has special claims.

©Centennial portfolio: a souvenir of the international exhibition at Philadelphia - 1876