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Brewers at the Exhibition Expo Philadelphia 1876

As an annex to the Palace of Agriculture, the United States Brewers have erected at a cost of $20,000 a special establishment designed to illustrate the mysteries of their ancient art. The building is 96 feet wide by 272 feet long.
It is two stories high, has a main facade that stands out from the centre of the hall and has a pleasing feature. A square tower rises from the roof and throws light into the interior. The design is simple and substantial, in keeping with the idea of a brewery - a style of structure to decoration whose architectural elegance has not been especially directed. Above the main southern entrance is a large statue of the cheerful King Gambrinus, whose memory as the inventor of lager is highly respected by every Teuton.
The second roof, at its elevation, displays a heroic-sized beer barrel, which is decorated with the flags of all the nations that indulge in malt liquors, which, in short, can be considered all the nations of the world.

Other entrances bear as trophies the instruments of the commercial complement to the preparation and production of beer, ale and porter. Above the eastern entrance door, inside, is a large trophy, in the centre of which is a medallion with this inscription:
DURING THE YEAR 1863, 1,558,083 BARRELS OF BEER WERE BREWED IN THE UNITED STATES; IN 1875, 8,743,744 BARRELS WERE PRODUCED FROM MALT LIQUORS ON WHICH A TAX WAS PAID OF $9,144,004.

This is a convenient way of presenting concise facts showing the prodigious growth of the business.

On the walls of the interior, prominently displayed, are inscriptions in English and German, embodying sentiments appropriate to the business. The central room has an 85 foot high roof. There are four other rooms, each 45 feet high. Adjacent is an ice house, with separate compartments for ale and beer, regulated according to temperature need, and a testing room.

It is inside that the Brewers' building expects to present the visitor with the most interesting topics. Even in the brewery it is possible to be historical; and the brewers offer their guests a model of the brewery of a hundred years ago, which differed very little from the brewery of a century earlier, and which contrasts with the brewery of today.

Here we can learn how William Penn, who was not a man of total abstinence, but who was very interested in brewing and vineyards, built his brew house in his Pennsbury manor house around 1683. In those days they had time, with grain plentiful and demand limited, to patiently prepare a good drink. But at this time, the high demand for malt liquors forced the brewer to hurry his product. The design of this establishment is to show how, with improved processes and machinery, the art of brewing can be accelerated in an honest way without the need for adulteration, in order to produce a pure liquor. Samples of the best ales, ales, porter and brown stouts made in this country and in Europe are also shown, and the result is a general satisfaction to the visitors.

Builder, James B. Doyle.

©Centennial portfolio: a souvenir of the international exhibition at Philadelphia - 1876